View Post

Levelling the playing field in scholarly communications

By Andrea Powell (Research4Life) and Rob Johnson, 04/03/19 Levelling the Playing Field: how can the global scholarly communications community address economic and infrastructure imbalances that prevent researchers from the Global South from achieving equality?  This was the question posed to a group of delegates at this year’s Researcher 2 Reader conference, held at BMA House in London on 25th & …

View Post

Getting to the heart of the Plan S debate

By Rob Johnson, 08/02/2019 Today sees the closure of the public consultation on the implementation guidance for Plan S, an initiative for Open Access publishing that was launched in September 2018.  In a recent article for UKSG Insights, “From coalition to commons: Plan S and the future of scholarly communication“, I sought to provide a theoretical framework for understanding the development, …

View Post

Publication of the STM Report 2018

By Rob Johnson, 09/10/2018 Today sees the launch of the 50th anniversary edition of ‘The STM Report: An overview of scientific and scholarly publishing’ (2018). Over the last six months I and my co-authors, Anthony Watkinson and Michael Mabe, have been hard at work pulling together the evidence base for this authoritative report covering all aspects of journal publishing, including …

View Post

The end of the road for hybrid open access?

By Rob Johnson, 17/07/2018 Over the past few weeks, I have discussed the role of ‘hybrid’ open access (OA) in a post on the Scholarly Kitchen (Time to Check Out of the Hybrid Hotel?) and in a Podcast in the Copyright Clearance Center “Beyond the Book” series. Hybrid journals are closed-access subscription journals that allow authors, institutions, or funders to …

View Post

Getting ready for open research

By Andrea Chiarelli, 29/06/2018 On Tuesday 26th June, I attended the Inside Government event Moving Towards Full Open Access in Higher Education in London. The event dealt with open access and its challenges but also, more broadly, with open research. Thanks to a pool of high-profile speakers, we were presented with a series of significant observations – in this post, …

View Post

Eight reasons early posting models are taking off in 2018

Guest post by Christine Ferguson, 06/03/2018 Momentum continues to grow for early posting initiatives such as preprints and ‘Open Research’ platforms. In a previous post, I provided a recap of early posting models that have attracted buy-in from key stakeholders in the life sciences in recent years. Below, I recount eight reasons why these platforms are likely to be used …

View Post

The Role of Hybrid Open Access in Extending Author Choice

by Andrea Chiarelli, 26/02/2018 Our report for the Publishing Research Consortium (PRC) has been released on 23 February. Working in partnership with Pleiade Management and Consultancy, we interviewed 33 authors of gold open access articles to understand their motivations and influencing factors when selecting the Hybrid OA option. The report found that the most important factor for researchers when deciding where …

View Post

The rise of preprints in life sciences

Guest post by Christine Ferguson, 23/02/2018 If anything has gained traction in the open science arena over the past couple of years, it is preprints: the posting of research outputs as soon as they are in draft form, ahead of formal peer review. In this post, the first of two on the topic of preprints, I take a look back …

View Post

Why are new university presses on the rise, and how can you get involved?

Guest post by Megan Taylor, University of Huddersfield Press, 05/02/2018 Publishing has been part of the UK university landscape since the 16th century. At that time, Cambridge University Press was launched, closely followed by Oxford University Press. Since then, many other presses, including Edinburgh, Liverpool and Manchester, have joined the ranks and grown to rival even some of the larger …

View Post

Adoption of open access is rising – but so too are its costs

By Stephen Pinfield and Rob Johnson, 22 Jan 2018 This post orginally appeared on the LSE impact blog: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/. Options available to authors to make their work open access are on the rise. Adoption of open access itself is also rising, and usage of open-access materials is similarly increasing. However, alongside rising access levels another, less positive rise can also be observed: the …