View Post

Eight reasons early posting models are taking off in 2018

Guest post by Christine Ferguson, 06/03/2018 Momentum continues to grow for early posting initiatives such as preprints and ‘Open Research’ platforms. In a previous post, I provided a recap of early posting models that have attracted buy-in from key stakeholders in the life sciences in recent years. Below, I recount eight reasons why these platforms are likely to be used …

View Post

The Role of Hybrid Open Access in Extending Author Choice

by Andrea Chiarelli, 26/02/2018 Our report for the Publishing Research Consortium (PRC) has been released on 23 February. Working in partnership with Pleiade Management and Consultancy, we interviewed 33 authors of gold open access articles to understand their motivations and influencing factors when selecting the Hybrid OA option. The report found that the most important factor for researchers when deciding where …

View Post

The rise of preprints in life sciences

Guest post by Christine Ferguson, 23/02/2018 If anything has gained traction in the open science arena over the past couple of years, it is preprints: the posting of research outputs as soon as they are in draft form, ahead of formal peer review. In this post, the first of two on the topic of preprints, I take a look back …

View Post

Why are new university presses on the rise, and how can you get involved?

Guest post by Megan Taylor, University of Huddersfield Press, 05/02/2018 Publishing has been part of the UK university landscape since the 16th century. At that time, Cambridge University Press was launched, closely followed by Oxford University Press. Since then, many other presses, including Edinburgh, Liverpool and Manchester, have joined the ranks and grown to rival even some of the larger …

View Post

Adoption of open access is rising – but so too are its costs

By Stephen Pinfield and Rob Johnson, 22 Jan 2018 This post orginally appeared on the LSE impact blog: http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/. Options available to authors to make their work open access are on the rise. Adoption of open access itself is also rising, and usage of open-access materials is similarly increasing. However, alongside rising access levels another, less positive rise can also be observed: the …

View Post

Monitoring the transition to open access: progress in 2017

By Rob Johnson, 6 Dec 2017 Over the past few months, we have been involved in a consortium to deliver the 2017 iteration of the ‘Monitoring the transition to open access’ report. Led by Jubb Consulting, we worked with colleagues at the University of Sheffield and Elsevier to evaluate recent developments in this ever-changing field and their implications for the …

View Post

Promoting good practice in research contracts management

By Andrea Chiarelli, 16 Nov 2017 In early October, we published a blog post to announce our 2018 research contracts benchmarking exercise, building on the 2013 exercise run by our Director Rob Johnson and seeking to: generate a broader set of comparators, by opening up the exercise to all research-active HEIs; and help institutions respond to ongoing and new challenges in the research …

View Post

Learned societies and open access

By Rob Johnson, 18 Oct 2017 Since 2015, the Universities’ UK Open Access Co-ordination Group has commissioned a bi-annual exercise to monitor the UK’s transition to open access, including the financial health of learned societies. As part of this exercise, I have been working with Professor Robert Dingwall to assess how 30 UK learned societies have fared between 2011 and …

View Post

Getting to grips with research contracts

By Rob Johnson, 2 Oct 2017 Back in 2013, I ran a benchmarking exercise for 20 research-intensive universities in the UK, looking at how they handled contracts for research and research-related activities. The driver for the exercise was the rapid growth in the volume and complexity of research contracts managed by UK higher education institutions (HEIs). This was leading to …

View Post

How can we boost the impact of Social Sciences and Humanities? A report from Cardiff

By Mattia Fosci, 29 Sep 2017 Last week I attended the AESIS conference on Boosting the impact of Social Sciences and Humanities in Cardiff. It was an event-packed two-day conference with over 150 participants from academia, research funders and social scientists coming from the UK, Europe and North America. As a social science researcher routinely working with practice, the underlying assumption …